United States

Zoetis Launches Witness® FFH to Detect Trio of Critical Diseases in Cats

Diagnostic test identifies immune response to feline immunodeficiency virus and presence of feline leukemia virus and heartworm

PARSIPPANY, N.J. – Oct. 3, 2017— Zoetis Inc. announced today the launch of Witness® FFH, a triple test that detects antigens to feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline heartworm, as well as antibodies to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV).

Witness® FFH is a simple, convenient and cost-effective test that delivers accurate results1-3 but requires less preparation time than other tests already available in the market. Additionally, Witness FFH requires no refrigeration and is priced comparably to current FeLV-FIV tests on the market with the added benefit of heartworm testing.

“Zoetis is committed to delivering high-quality, point-of-care diagnostics to help easily and affordably diagnose conditions or diseases that affect the quality or duration of a pet’s life,” said Chris Demiris, marketing director, U.S. Diagnostics at Zoetis. “The new Witness FFH test is a rapid, reliable test that helps keep cats healthy.”

“A shared clinical sign of all three diseases is vomiting, so a triple test helps veterinarians make accurate diagnoses more quickly,” said Dr. Matthew Krecic, senior technical services manager, U.S. Diagnostics at Zoetis. “Sick cats may also have FeLV or FIV; therefore, testing for those concurrent with heartworm is sensible.”

Veterinarians should consider testing for heartworm infection in cats because clinical signs can be confused with those of many other diseases, including feline asthma. In addition to vomiting, affected cats may cough and have difficulty breathing. The disease is caused by an inflammatory reaction to the presence of heartworm or immature adult worms.4,5

“As atypical hosts, heartworm infection in cats presents differently than it does in dogs,” Krecic said. “Feline heartworm affects the lungs much more often than the heart, and a cat’s lungs are profoundly reactive to the arrival or death of heartworm or heartworm larvae. This reactivity can lead to significant morbidity and even death.”

Witness FFH is the latest test offered by Zoetis as it continues to expand its Diagnostics portfolio. In April, the company launched Witness® Lepto, the first point-of-care test available in the United States for the specific detection of anti-Leptospira immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies to four of the most common serovars affecting dogs in the United States.

For more information about Witness FFH or any diagnostic test offered by Zoetis, please visit www.simplysmarterchoice.com.

About Zoetis
Zoetis is the leading animal health company, dedicated to supporting its customers and their businesses. Building on more than 60 years of experience in animal health, Zoetis discovers, develops, manufactures and markets veterinary vaccines and medicines, complemented by diagnostic products, genetic tests, biodevices and a range of services. Zoetis serves veterinarians, livestock producers and people who raise and care for farm and companion animals with sales of its products in more than 100 countries. In 2016, the company generated annual revenue of $4.9 billion with approximately 9,000 employees. For more information, visit www.zoetisus.com.

For further info contact:
Chris Demiris
Marketing Director, U.S. Diagnostics
Zoetis
973.443.3139
Chris.demiris@zoetis.com

Lindsey Goodman
Archer Malmo
706.201.6721
lgoodman@archermalmo.com

References:
1 Data on file, Study Report No. D886R-US-17-038, Zoetis Inc.
2 Data on file, Study Report No. D886R-US-16-033, Zoetis Inc.
3 Data on file, Study Report No. D886R-US-16-032, Zoetis Inc.
4 Browne LE, Carter TD, Levy JK, Snyder PS, Johnson CM. Pulmonary arterial disease in cats seropositive for Dirofilaria immitis but lacking adult heartworms in the heart and lungs. Am J Vet Res. 2005;66(9):1544-1549.
5 Lin CH, Lo PY, Tsai HJ, et al. Dirofilaria immitis exposure status in client-owned cats with or without lower airway/lung-associated signs: case-control study in a canine heartworm-endemic area. J Feline Med Surg. 2017;19(2):153-157.